Grapefruit Torte

Fresh citrus in the winter is one of my favorite things. It’s dreary here in Seattle and the cloud cover and constant drizzle, really puts a damper on the mood. It’s no wonder people around here take Vitamin D supplements, fake-and-bake and become snowbirds to beat the winter blues. I’m a fan of Vitamin D and take it daily. (Feel free to send me a message to learn what my favorite brand is.) I’m also a fan of eating happy fruit. I don’t know why, but I consider citrus happy fruit. This breakfast dessert is fantastic. And super easy to make. So easy, in fact, that most people will think you slaved over it when they eat it (which makes it fantastic for a last minute Christmas brunch dessert). When they make those comments, smile sweetly and say “Thank you” – this recipe will be our little secret. Unless you decide to share it with them. I wouldn’t blame you if you did.

If you have never segmented and cleaned a grapefruit, here’s a short little video to help you out. It’s super easy. And looks fantastic. I squeeze the remaining fruit meat and use it to for a second ferment for my kombucha or water kefir. Talk about major yummy!

Grapefruit Torte
Serves: 8            Cook Time: 30 minutes

For the Crust:

  • 1/4 cup almond flour
  • 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons coconut flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 cup coconut oil, softened
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 1 pasture-raised and organic egg, beaten
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons organic vanilla extract

For the filling:

  • 1 package organic pasture-raised cream cheese, softened (8 oz)
  • 1/3 cup crème fraîche (Trader Joe’s sells it for a reasonable price. If you can’t find it, grass-fed whole fat Greek yogurt will work)
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 1 tsp organic ginger
  • 1 tbsp organic grapefruit zest
  • 3 cups organic grapefruit, peeled and segmented (About 2 grapefruit)
  • Coarse sea salt

To prepare the crust:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. With a fork, sift the dry ingredients in a medium bowl.
  3. In a separate small bowl, whisk together the crust’s wet ingredients.
  4. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and fold until incorporated.
  5. Using wetted (with water) fingers, press the dough evenly into a 9-inch pie or tart pan, making sure to cover the bottom and the sides of the pan. If you don’t have a torte pan, use a spring form pan.
  6. Let the crust cool and leave in the pan.

For the torte filling:

  1. Combine the cream cheese, creme fraiche, honey, ginger and grapefruit zest and mix at medium speed with a mixer until smooth.
  2. Spread mixture over crust with a spatula.
  3. Line grapefruit segments on filling to cover.
  4. Sprinkle coarse sea salt over tart, slice and serve immediately.

Fire Cider

My mom first told me about fire cider. I was over at my parents’ house and was complaining about a sore throat. She handed me a bottle of liquid that smelled awful and instructed me to take a teaspoon. She didn’t tell me what was in it. Just to drink it. So I did (because it’s my mom). The taste wasn’t as bad as I thought. But I like garlic. A lot. A few more doses and my sore throat was gone and I was feeling back to my old self.

What was this liquid concoction? Fire Cider. It’s a popular folk remedy, inspired by the work of Rosemary Gladstar (an awesome herbalist from New England), that’s really easy to make. A few key ingredients, a month of sitting, and you have yourself a beverage that’s going to do wonders with either warding off a cold or helping get rid of it at the first signs of illness. And, with looking at all of the ingredients, it’s no wonder it’s called fire cider!

Fire Cider

  • 1/2 cup grated organic ginger
  • 1/2 cup fresh organic chopped horseradish root (This will open your sinuses when you chop it – be prepared!)
  • 2 medium organic onions, chopped
  • 10 organic garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 organic jalapeno, sliced thin
  • 1 organic lemon, sliced thin (and seeded)
  • 1 organic lime, sliced thin (and seeded)
  • 1 organic orange, sliced thin (and seeded)
  • 3 tbsp dried organic rosemary
  • 1 tbsp organic turmeric powder
  • 1/4 tsp organic cayenne powder
  • organic raw apple cider vinegar
  • raw local honey, to taste
  1. Stuff ingredients into a half-gallon jar, putting the roots on the top to hold the roots down below the vinegar line.
  2. Pour organic raw apple cider vinegar over everything, working out air bubbles and submerging everything.
  3. Put a piece of parchment under the lid, if using a metal lid, or use a glass or plastic lid. Store in a dark cool place and shake daily for one month.
  4. After one month, strain out the liquid using a cheesecloth and store in a clean jar. Squeeze as much of the liquid out of the pulp as possible. Add a bit of honey to taste (I usually add no more than 1/4 cup) and stir until incorporated.
  5. Store in the refrigerator for all of winter and take 1 tbsp daily to help boost your immune system and 2-3 tbsp if you start to feel a cold coming on!

 

Polish Hunter’s Stew

If you’ve never had Polish Hunter’s Stew, known as Bigos, it’s fantastic! Traditionally a winter stew that was made to help pump the lifeblood back into someone (let’s be honest, Polish winters are brutal), you don’t have to be a fan of sauerkraut to enjoy it. The flavors mute while cooking and the result is a fantastic creamy stew that is so so so fantastic, all you want to do is eat and eat and eat. I’ve had worse problems in life than wanting to eat all the bigos. Homemade sauerkraut is best for this dish – I make my sauerkraut by the 2 liter container and weight out how much I need. You can buy sauerkraut for this dish, but make sure it’s a good quality sauerkraut, many of the canned stuff and even the “barrel cured” brands have cruddy additives in it.

This is one stew that really does get better with age. It was about day 3 of leftovers and everything was enhanced and fantastic. Enjoy it the first night and love it a few days in! Either way, here’s a fantastic stew if you find yourself with a superabundance of homemade sauerkraut (not that that ever really happens in my household).

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