Caramelized Onion and Gorgonzola Frittata

I made this frittata for Mother’s Day and it was a hit – except for the 11 year old who doesn’t like stinky cheese and my sister’s 24 year old boyfriend… who also doesn’t like stinky cheese. Haters gonna hate.

The frittata is a spin-off of a great restaurant here in Portland that is renowned for their weekend brunches. In fact, it’s usually an hour wait minimum on the weekends. Ouch, right? But in all seriousness, we love our brunch in Portland. So much so that they made a Portlandia skit about us.

So yea. Apparently we’ll do just about anything to get to a good brunch place.

Okay, so this frittata. It’s so easy. As are most frittatas. The main specialty item you will need is a well-seasoned cast iron pan (which should be a staple in any kitchen anyway) or a skillet that can go in the oven.

Choosing a mild Gorgonzola is key. It’s a stinky cheese and can easily overpower other flavors. I talked to the cheese counter dude at the local cheese shop… okay. New Seasons. I talked to the guy at New Seasons. I’m not that fancy, even though there are some FANTASTIC cheese shops in the Portland area. But, cheese people – they know their cheese. Tell them you’re making a frittata and want something mild that won’t magnify in the oven. They’ll know exactly which cheese to set you up with. If they don’t, find a new cheese guy. 🙂 If you’re doing level 3 of the 21 Day Sugar Detox, omit the cheese and also omit if you’re dairy free.

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Finally, make sure you don’t toss your excess butter – by the time you’re done caramelizing the onions, it will be infused with onion goodness. It’s what makes this dish fantastic – that and the bacon and cheese.

Here goes!

Caramelized Onion and Gorgonzola Frittata

  • 2 onions, cut in half and thinly sliced into “half moons”
  • ½ cup organic grass-fed salted butter
  • 1 dozen pasture-raised eggs, beaten
  • 4 strips bacon, minced and cooked
  • ½ cup Gorgonzola cheese, crumbled (or any mild bleu cheese)
  • salt and pepper to taste
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit (wait until onions are almost done, it could take a while).
  2. In an 8" (or wider if your skillet is shallow) cast iron skillet, and over medium-low heat, melt the ½ cup of butter. Add onions and saute until onions are caramelized (see link if you need a great how-to from The Kitchn).
  3. Remove onions and set aside, being careful to keep as much of the butter as you can in the pan. Swirl the butter around so it coats the bottom and all of the sides of the pan.
  4. While pan is hot, pour in beaten eggs. “Sprinkle” carmelized onions, bacon and crumbled Gorgonzola on top.
  5. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.
  6. Place in the oven and bake for 8-10 minutes, or until a knife in the middle comes out clean.
  7. Set aside and allow the eggs to set. Cut like a pie and serve warm.

How to Make Whey (and Yummy Cream Cheese)

It’s so ridiculously easy and I’ve done it many times before but never posted about it for a few reasons:

  1. Everyone seems to have a “how to make whey” post on their website
  2. Everyone seems to have….
  3. It’s a skill that I’ve taken for granted. 
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(The before… after about 10 minutes of dripping)

This is seriously one of the easiest things in the world. So if you’re new to the world of primal food preparation or fermenting, this is a good starting point. 

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(The after)

Here’s an overview of the supplies: 

  • Full-fat organic plain yogurt. I use Nancy’s Organic Whole Milk Yogurt. You DO NOT want to use anything that is fat-reduced. Why? Because I said. Okay, it’s because reduced-fat milk products replace the fat with additives – like sugar and dried milk (which is bad for you). So stick with the full-fat organic plain yogurt that has absolutely nothing in it.
  • Organic Muslin. Cotton is GMO’d here in America and in India and they use crazy amounts of pesticides on it. You’ll pay more for organic but it’s worth it, especially if you have your food sitting in it for extended periods of time. I’ll buy a few yards at a time and keep it on hand in my ever-growing fabric stash. 
  • A large jar or a deep bowl. I buy my honey by the gallon and save the jars for future use. They’re just so so handy. Especially when you need something to hang your yogurt bag off of and don’t feel like cleaning up whey splash in the morning. 

Enough about that, here’s the complete tool list and the how-to for….

Whey (and Yummy Cream Cheese)

  • One 32-ounce tub Nancy’s Organic Whole Milk Yogurt (can use a half tub, I’d rather get it all done with right then).
  • A few large rubber bands – like the ones that hold broccoli heads together. If you don’t save them, start doing it. Or, you’ll need lots of string.
  • Organic muslin or a thin dish towel – no terry cloth towels!
  • A deep bowl, medium-sized
  • Something to suspend the bag of yogurt – I use a wooden spoon
  1. Drape the fabric/towel over the bowl and empty the yogurt tub into the middle.
  2. Bring up the corners and secure with the rubber band or a string.
  3. Either secure yogurt bag off of a cupboard handle (if you have one) with a string, with bowl underneath to catch the dripping liquid -OR- using another rubber band, secure a wooden spoon to the bag and hang over bowl, having enough clearance to not let it sit in the whey that will be catching at the bottom.
  4. Set out overnight, or until the bag is no longer dripping. You will have about 2 cups of whey and 2 cups of cream cheese. 
  5. Store whey in a sealed glass container for up to 6 months, use it for a Beet Kvass or Lacto-Fermented Ketchup starter and for many more ferments coming soon to Northwest Primal.
  6. Store cream cheese in a glass container as well and use as you would store bought cream cheese. (If you’re looking for inspiration, I highly suggest my Grapefruit Torte.)

And that’s it! It’s so easy!